Placeography:Featured place/2017-12

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The first drive-in in Minnesota opened in 1948 in Bloomington. Drive-ins theatres took off at the end of WWII as raw materials were more readily available thus allowing a substantial increase in production of and the rise in popularity of the automobiles. In the 1960s and 1970s, families moved away from the cities  that had indoor movie theatres were  to the suburbs  where outdoor drive-in theaters were available for family entertainment.  Moms and dads and the kiddos in the back of the station wagon travelled to nearby drive-ins.  When the movie started at twilight, the kids fell asleep and mom and dad could enjoy an inexpensive night out under the stars viewing the movie on a large screen and listening to the sound from the speaker placed on the driver's side window.
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The first drive-in in Minnesota opened in 1948 in Bloomington. Drive-ins theatres took off at the end of WWII due to an increase in the popularity of the automobiles. In the 1960s and 1970s, families moved away from the cities  that had indoor movie theatres to the suburbs  where outdoor drive-in theaters were available for family entertainment.  Moms and dads and the kiddos in the back of the station wagon traveled to nearby drive-ins.  When the movie started at twilight, the kids fell asleep and mom and dad could enjoy an inexpensive night out under the stars viewing the movie on a large screen and listening to the sound from the speaker placed on the driver's side window.
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Revision as of 19:05, December 5, 2017

Minnesota Drive-In Theatres

The first drive-in in Minnesota opened in 1948 in Bloomington. Drive-ins theatres took off at the end of WWII due to an increase in the popularity of the automobiles. In the 1960s and 1970s, families moved away from the cities that had indoor movie theatres to the suburbs where outdoor drive-in theaters were available for family entertainment. Moms and dads and the kiddos in the back of the station wagon traveled to nearby drive-ins. When the movie started at twilight, the kids fell asleep and mom and dad could enjoy an inexpensive night out under the stars viewing the movie on a large screen and listening to the sound from the speaker placed on the driver's side window.

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