Johnson School, 3100 38th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Razed)

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Johnson Elementary School was built in 1910 and named in honor of  John A. Johnson, the recently deceased Governor of Minnesota.  The following year Cleveland Senior High School in St. Paul was likewise renamed Johnson High School.  Johnson Elementary closed in 1942,<ref>[http://www.electiontrendsproject.org/lists/inventory.html An Inventory Of The Schoolhouses Of Minneapolis] ''electiontrendsproject.org''. Retrieved 02/07/15.</ref> but the building survived another thirty years until the property was sold by the School Board and converted to residential use.  
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Johnson Elementary School was built in 1910 and named in honor of  John A. Johnson, the recently deceased Governor of Minnesota.  The following year Cleveland Senior High School in St. Paul was likewise renamed Johnson High School.  Johnson Elementary closed in 1942,<ref>[http://www.electiontrendsproject.org/lists/inventory.html An Inventory Of The Schoolhouses Of Minneapolis] ''electiontrendsproject.org''. Retrieved 02/07/15.</ref> but the building survived another thirty years until the property was sold by the School Board and converted to residential use.<ref name="Longfellow 2009">''The neighborhood by the falls: a look back at life in Longfellow'' by Eric Hart, (Minneapolis: Longfellow Community Council, 2009).</ref>
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"Soon after Johnson School opened in 1910, storefronts such as that of Seven Oaks Bakery popped up across the street, making the school and its environs the center of the 'Seven Oaks' district."  Buildings, which once housed a bakery, grocery store and meat market, still stand at 3149 - 3151 38th Avenue South.<ref name="Longfellow 2009"/>
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== Photo Gallery ==
== Photo Gallery ==
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==Additional reading==
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''The neighborhood by the falls: a look back at life in Longfellow'' by Eric Hart, (Minneapolis: Longfellow Community Council, 2009)
== Related Links ==
== Related Links ==
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*[http://apps.hclib.org/collections/mplsphotos/results.cfm?subject=North%20Star%20Research%20Institute Johnson School building 1974]
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*[https://ia600806.us.archive.org/8/items/MusicOfTheMidwest/22NorthStarResearchInstitute1974.jpg Johnson School building 1974]
*[http://www.electiontrendsproject.org/lists/inventory.html An Inventory Of The Schoolhouses Of Minneapolis]
*[http://www.electiontrendsproject.org/lists/inventory.html An Inventory Of The Schoolhouses Of Minneapolis]
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== Notes ==
== Notes ==
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Current revision

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Johnson School

Address: 3100 38th Avenue S
Neighborhood/s: Longfellow, Minneapolis, Minnesota
City/locality-
State/province
Minneapolis, Minnesota
County-
State/province:
Hennepin County, Minnesota
State/province: Minnesota
Country: United States

Longfellow Minneapolis Hennepin

Johnson School, 3100 38th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Razed)
(44.9467947° N, 93.2177962° WLatitude: 44°56′48.461″N
Longitude: 93°13′4.066″W
)

Johnson Elementary School was built in 1910 and named in honor of John A. Johnson, the recently deceased Governor of Minnesota. The following year Cleveland Senior High School in St. Paul was likewise renamed Johnson High School. Johnson Elementary closed in 1942,[1] but the building survived another thirty years until the property was sold by the School Board and converted to residential use.[1]


"Soon after Johnson School opened in 1910, storefronts such as that of Seven Oaks Bakery popped up across the street, making the school and its environs the center of the 'Seven Oaks' district." Buildings, which once housed a bakery, grocery store and meat market, still stand at 3149 - 3151 38th Avenue South.[1]


Contents


Memories and stories

Photo Gallery

Additional reading

The neighborhood by the falls: a look back at life in Longfellow by Eric Hart, (Minneapolis: Longfellow Community Council, 2009)

Related Links

Notes

    Personal tools
    Contribute
    [http://discussions.mnhs.org/HP/oneonone.cfm snubnosed]