El Lago Theater, 3506 - East Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota

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Revision as of 03:25, December 18, 2017

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El Lago Theater

El Lago Theater (1948) MN Streetcar Museum
El Lago Theater building (2010) ©Earl Leatherberry
Address: 3506 Lake Street E
Neighborhood/s: Longfellow, Minneapolis, Minnesota
City/locality-
State/province
Minneapolis, Minnesota
County-
State/province:
Hennepin County, Minnesota
State/province: Minnesota
Country: United States
Year built: 1927
Primary Style: Other
Historic Function: Theater/concert hall
Current Function: Religious/Place of worship
Material of Exterior Wall Covering: Brick

Longfellow Minneapolis Hennepin County

El Lago Theater, 3506 - East Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota
(44.948658° N, 93.221372° WLatitude: 44°56′55.169″N
Longitude: 93°13′16.939″W
)
National Register of Historic Places Information


The El Lago Theater was a 600 seat neighborhood movie theater. It was built in 1927 and was in business from 1933 to 1966. The owner in 1930 was the Lake Amusement Company, which also owned the Lake Theatre at 2721 E. Lake St. and the East Lake Theatre at 1537 E. Lake St. "With exotic facade and Spanish name (El Lago means 'The Lake'), the theater was all about fantasy and escape from the everyday world. Some described the difficult-to-categorize building as 'a 1920s interpretation of 16th-century Italian, with a Georgian, almost Baroque facade.'" [1]

El Lago Theater stands on 3500 Lake Street East in the Longfellow neighborhood of Minneapolis. It was constructed in 1927 by Eckman Holm and Co. Since the 1970s, the building has been used as a church, housing Victory Christian Center. The facade combines Moorish revival architecture with Baroque classicism. Adorned with an array of bright patterns, the facade is reminiscent of the mosaic walls of the Alhambra in Spain.

Contents


Memories and stories

Badges

65}px This place is part of the
Moorish Revival Style




Photo Gallery

Additional reading

The neighborhood by the falls: a look back at life in Longfellow by Eric Hart, (Minneapolis: Longfellow Community Council, 2009)

Related Links


Notes

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    [http://discussions.mnhs.org/HP/oneonone.cfm snubnosed]