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1508 Dupont Avenue North, Minneapolis, Minnesota

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Case-Lang House

Unknown Date
2006, Photo by Minneapolis CPED
Address: 1508 Dupont Avenue N
Neighborhood/s: Old Highland, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Near North, Minneapolis, Minnesota
City/locality-
State/province
Minneapolis, Minnesota
County-
State/province:
Hennepin County, Minnesota
State/province: Minnesota
Country: United States
Year built: 1865-85
Primary Style: Italianate
Secondary Style: Greek Revival
Major Alterations: Intact
Moved from Location: 1910 6th St. N. in 1981
Historic Function: House/single dwelling or duplex
Current Function: House/single dwelling or duplex
Material of Exterior Wall Covering: Wood
Material of Roof: Asphalt
First Owner: Emanuel Case

Old Highland, Near North Minneapolis Hennepin County


Associated with one of Minneapolis’ pioneering merchants and farmers, the Case-Lang House remains an important surviving example of a first-generation Minneapolis residence.

Property Description: 2 stories; front-facing gable; low-pitched roof with widely overhanging eaves; decorative brackets beneath eaves; one story, wrap-around porch with Doric columns; entry door on western façade has transom light above; Greek revival features include gable returns and wide frieze boards


“The Case/Lang House was constructed ca 1865-1870 as a simple two story frame residence. The design incorporates several features from the Greek Revival and Italianate styles which were popular during that period. Greek Revival features include a low-pitch gable roof with simple chimneys, gable returns, and wide friezeboards in addition to a characteristic three-bay front façade. Italianate features include delicate sawn brackets and tall two-over-two double hung windows. One story porches with square “Doric” columns are located on the front and south sides of the structure.”1

“During the early 1880’s the simple appearance of the house was altered to accommodate Victorian taste by the second owner, Peter Mootz, who had purchased the property from the Case heirs in 1880. Mootz adde two one-story bays to widen the first floor plan, a fretwork gable ornamentand a large plate-glass window in the front parlor. Original sash and millwork were re-used in the construction of the bays , preserving the design continuity of the interior detailing.” 2

1. Nelson, Charles. National Register of Historic Places Inventory -- Nomination Form: Case / Lang House. Rep. St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society, 1981. Print.

2. Nelson, Charles. National Register of Historic Places Inventory -- Nomination Form: Case / Lang House. Rep. St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society, 1981. Print.

Contents

History

Stylistically, the house illustrates the transition from Greek Revival to Italianate, the preferred form found in many Civil War era homes. Its first owner, Emanuel Case, arrived in Saint Anthony in 1851. He operated a store until 1856 when he staked his land claim with Alexander Moore in the region north of the old Military Reserve Line. He cultivated the region until his death in 1871. In addition to farming, Case was active in civic affairs and was a founder of the Minnesota Agricultural Society and Cataract Lodge #2 AF&AM. Although altered by two subsequent owners, Peter Mootz and John Lang, the residence retains considerable integrity, preserved through a conscious re-use of existing materials and design elements.

Threatened by a land development program in 1981, the house was moved as an alternative to demolition. It was relocated on a site six blocks from the original site in a neighborhood of predominantly late nineteenth century dwellings. (from Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission

Proposed substitute text below? Originally constructed at 1910 6th St. N. ca 1865-1870. The home was threatened by demolition for commercial development on West Broadway in 1981 . The house was moved as an alternative to demolition. It was relocated to the Old Highland Neighborhood, by Charlie and Angie Nelson, to it's current location at 1508 Dupont, a site just six blocks from the original site in a neighborhood of predominantly late nineteenth century dwellings.

Memories and stories

Photo Gallery

Related Links

[1]Case-Lang House

Image:Tdlindberg--1508 Dupont - 1980's walking tour.pdf 1508 Bryant Ave. N., 1980's Walking Tour entry

Residents' Thoughts

In your opinion, where is the most interesting place in Old Highland? Why?

If you could tell someone moving here one thing about this community, what would you tell them?

Why do you think this is a good place for young people?


Notes

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    [http://discussions.mnhs.org/HP/oneonone.cfm snubnosed]