Nathaniel and Anne McMillan McCarthy House, 118 West Elmwood Place, Minneapolis, Minnesota

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Nathaniel and Anne McMillan McCarthy House

Address: 118 Elmwood Place W
Neighborhood/s: Tangletown, Minneapolis, Minnesota
City/locality-
State/province
Minneapolis, Minnesota
County-
State/province:
Hennepin County, Minnesota
State/province: Minnesota
Country: United States
Year built: 1890
Primary Style: Colonial Revival
Secondary Style: Shingle
Additions: [[Additions:=West addition and renovation, 1907

North addition (date unknown, removed 1991)

North addition designed by Joseph G. Metzler of Mulfinger & Susanka Architects (now SALA Architects), 1991

Carriage House designed by Joseph G. Metzler of Mulfinger & Susanka Architects (now SALA Architects), 1994]]

Historic Function: House/single dwelling or duplex
Current Function: House/single dwelling or duplex
Architect or source of design: [[Source of design::Harry Wild Jones (consulting) / Mulfinger & Susanka Architects (now SALA Architects)]]
Material of Exterior Wall Covering: Weatherboard
Material of Foundation: Stone
First Owner: Nathaniel and Anne McMillan McCarthy

Tangletown Minneapolis Hennepin

Nathaniel and Anne McMillan McCarthy House, 118 West Elmwood Place, Minneapolis, Minnesota
(44.910239° N, 93.2803° WLatitude: 44°54′36.86″N
Longitude: 93°16′49.08″W
)


The original home built in 1890 comprised a bit less than the eastern half of the current home. According to author Elizabeth Vandam in her book The Doors of Tangletown, neighbor Harry Wild Jones was a family friend and provided architectural assistance.

Nathaniel opened one of the earliest bookstores, Clark & McCarthy, in Minneapolis. He also sold hardy flowers that he raised on land he leased near his home. The home remained in the family until Anne's death in 1953.

Contents

History

In 1907 an addition to the west more than doubled the size of the original home. At this time the round arched dormer of the original structure was replaced with a long shed dormer that stretched between projecting hipped roof dormers on each end. The original porch was extended across the entire front and the classical posts were replaced by stone piers. An nonsympathetic two-story addition containing a kitchen was added to the rear (north) at some point. A nonsympathetic two-stall garage was also added.

The original rear addition was replaced by a slightly larger addition designed by Joseph G. Metzler of Mulfinger & Susanka Architects (now SALA Architects) in 1991. It contained a new kitchen, breakfast room and half bath on the main level and a laundry room, exercise room and covered porch on the upper level. Three years later a new carriage house was added that mimics the form of the residence and provides an upstairs workshop with on-grade access from the rear. This was also designed by Joseph Metzler.

The 1991 addition and carriage house was the recipient of a 1996 Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Award and a 1996 Great American Home Award sponsored by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. These additions were also featured in the October/November 1999 issue of Midwest Home & Garden, The Not So Big House by Sarah Susanka, Planning Your Addition by Jerry Germer, the November 1996 issue of Better Homes and Gardens, the January/February issue of Historic Preservation, and the April 1995 issue of Architectural Record.

Memories and stories

Photo Gallery

Related Links

Notes

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