Handicraft Guild, 89-91 10th Street South, Minneapolis, Minnesota

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Handicraft Guild

Address: 89 10th Street S
Neighborhood/s: Downtown West, Minneapolis, Minnesota
City/locality-
State/province
Minneapolis, Minnesota
County-
State/province:
Hennepin County, Minnesota
State/province: Minnesota
Country: United States
Year built: 1907
Primary Style: Georgian
Additions: 1004 Marquette Avenue South in 1914
Historic Function: School
Current Function: Business
Architect or source of design: William Channing Whitney
Builder: H.N. Leighton
Material of Exterior Wall Covering: Brick
Building Permit Number: A12663
First Owner: Handicraft Guild
Notes: Handicraft Guild Addition(1914)

1004 Marquette

Downtown West Minneapolis Hennepin


The Handicraft Guild came into existence in 1904 to meet a pressing need for craft classes especially suited to requirements for training teachers of the public schools in handicrafts. There was also a recognized want of such training by others and there was no salesroom for artistic craft products nor any means of bringing the work of the local craftsmen to the notice of the buying public.

The Handicraft Guild School of Design, Handicraft and Normal Art, is established upon a basis of intimate relation between theory and practice, and also for the advancement of industrial art interests. The purpose of the school is to give authoritative instruction in design and its solution in terms of materials; also to furnish complete training for students desirous of becoming Craftsmen, Designers and Teachers.

In July 1905 the guild was less than a year old, but its directors announced that they would begin work to acquire yet another new facility. In February 1906, the officers announced the selection of a site and plans to build a permanent home for the guild. Minneapolis philanthropist Joseph R. Kingman provided the capital for the construction of the building. a local architect of national reputation, William Channing Whitney, agreed to design the multifunction facility.

By November 1907 a jubilant group of officers and staff moved into the guild's new home at 89 S. 10th Street, which was equipped to meet the needs not only of the guild, but those of others in the art community, local craftsworkers, educators, shopkeepers, and charitable groups as well.

The three-story brick and stone Georgian revival structure at 89 S. 10th Street offered precisely what the Minneapolis art community had sought for more than a decade. The large auditorium could accommodate lectures, general assemblies, exhibitions, and concerts. The long sales/display room featured a fireplace decorated with guild tiles.

There was a luncheon and tea room, a book shop, work shops, classrooms, stock rooms for supplies, and studios for craftsworkers, designers, and painters, as well as shops and offices for interior designers.

The guild facility also offered studio space to artists, designers, and craftspeople working in various media, further strengthening its relationship to the art community. Over the years those spaces were occupied by Elizabeth Norris, Susan Christian, bookbinders Winifred Cole and Edith Griffith, leather workers Nelbert Murphy and Margaret Sheardown, photographers Margaret Sheridan and Gertrude E. Mann, rare book dealer Edmund D. Brooks, the decorating studio of Gustav F. Weber, portraitist Hildur Peterson-Frey, jeweler Ida Pell Conklin and painter Elisabeth Chant.

The last Saturday of the month served as a day to informally visit studios and join a gathering in the guild tea room. More than fifty years later, the guild building remained a center of activity for local craftsworkers. Commerical artists, a violin maker, fashion designers, and cabinetmakers had successful showrooms and workshops in the guild building as late as 1973.

They were drawn there, as fashion designer Agnes Reed said, because it felt like home.

In 2015 a community of artists who are the Handicraft Guild Collective live and work in the Handicraft Guild building. Dahl Violin and Thomson Drum have businesses there. The shops on 10th street and Marquette have a rich diversity of businesses. Artists, tailors, a wig shop, a restaurant, a t-shirt printing shop, an art gallery are all there!

[1]


Founding Principles "The Guild came into existence last fall [1904] to meet a pressing need for craft classes especially suited to requirements for training teachers of the public schools in handicrafts. There was also a recognized want of such training by others and there was no salesroom for artistic craft products nor any means of bringing the work of the local craftsmen to the notice of the buying public."[1] "The Handicraft Guild School of Design, Handicraft and Normal Art, is established upon a basis of intimate relation between theory and practice, and also for the advancement of industrial art interest. The purpose of the school is to give authoritative instruction in design and its solution in terms of materials; also to furnish complete training for students desirious of becoming Craftsmen, Designers and Teachers." [1]


Officers
Mary Emma Roberts
Florence Wales
Mary Linton Bookwalter
Florence D. Willets

Founding Patrons
Miss Mary Moulton Cheney
Mrs. W.H. Dunwoody (Catherine L. Patten)
Mrs. C.A. Bovey (Caroline Hannah Brooks)
Mrs. E.J. Phelps (Louise Ann Richardson)
*Mr. Phelps was a business partner of John Scott Bradstreet
Mrs. J.C. Hall (Clarisa Jane)
Mrs. Thomas S. Roberts (Jane Cleveland)
Mrs. Perry Harrison (Miriam Thomas)
Mrs. George H. Christian (Lenora Hall)


Key Figures
Ernest Batchelder
Grant Wood
Margaret Kelly Cable
Mary Moulton Cheney
Mary Linton Bookwalter
Mary Emma Roberts
Florence Wales
Florence Willets
Elizabeth Augusta Chant
Ida Pell Conklin
Bertha Lum
James H. Winn
Douglas Donaldson
Harold L. Boyle
Maurice Irwin Flagg

Ruth Raymond

Contents


Memories and stories

Photo Gallery




Related Links

Handicraft Guild Addition (1914) 1004 Marquette

Slideshow - What does it look like?

Minnopedia-Handicraft Guild

Proposed development-2015

Articles

A Tale of Two Siblings

Minneapolis Star Tribune 7/3/2015

Minneapolis Star Tribune 6/21/2015

If These Walls Could Talk 5/19/2015

Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts Bulletin 1907

Art for Life's Sake

A New Art Industry 1905

Arts & Crafts Society - Mpls

John Scott Bradstreet

It's Here We Live

Artists

The Handicraft Guild Art Collective - Summer 2015

The Handicraft Guild Art Collective 2015

Biographies

Mary Emma Roberts

Grant Wood

Mary Moulton Cheney's jewelry designs

Mary Moulton Cheney - Chapter 13 Corinthians

Margaret Kelly Cable

Elisabeth Augusta Chant

Elisabeth Augusta Chant

Douglas Donaldson

Bertha Lum

Permit Cards and Historic Designation

Permit Cards

Building Permit

Minneapolis Local Historic Landmark Designation

National Register of Historic Places nomination 1997

Tenants

Dahl Violin shop - Dream Garage

Bob Black of Dahl Violin shop

Websites

Art & Crafts Society

History of the Arts & Crafts Movement



Notes

    Personal tools
    Contribute
    [http://discussions.mnhs.org/HP/oneonone.cfm snubnosed]