Andrew J. Hart House, 3217 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota

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Andrew J. Hart House

3217 Park Avenue - 2008
Side View - 2008
Address: 3217 Park Avenue
Neighborhood/s: Central, Minneapolis, Minnesota
City/locality-
State/province
Minneapolis, Minnesota
County-
State/province:
Hennepin County, Minnesota
State/province: Minnesota
Country: United States
Year built: 1892
Primary Style: Queen Anne
Historic Function: House/single dwelling or duplex
Current Function: House/single dwelling or duplex
Builder: E. M. Newcomb
Material of Roof: Asphalt Shingles
Material of Foundation: Limestone
First Owner: Andrew J. Hart
Part of the Site: Park Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Central Minneapolis Hennepin County


INTRODUCTION

According to Minneapolis building permits, a small dwelling, barn, and shed were built on this parcel of land as early as 1885. At that time, much of this stretch of Park Avenue was still being used as farmland and pastures. By 1892, however, the area was becoming an attractive suburban development of large, grand homes for the primarily upper-middle class businessman of the booming downtown business district. As a result, this parcel's original [likely farm-related] structures were torn down and replaced by the large Queen Anne seen here. Construction of the current structure was completed in August of 1892 by Builder E. M. Newcomb at a total cost of $3,820.


ORIGINAL OWNER

According to Minneapolis City Directories, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Hart were the home's first owners. Andrew Hart was a Superintendent of Bridges and Buildings for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway. Mr. Hart was widowed by 1907, but continued to live at 3217 Park Avenue until 1918 with his daughter, Alice, and her husband, William L. Brown, a Minneapolis Advertising Designer. The Hart family employed a live-in servant named Anna Anderson.


ARCHITECTURAL STYLE

With its steeply pitched roof, varying gables, assymetry, elaborate front gable detailing, and numerous bays and bump outs 3217 Park Avenue represents a fine example of classic Queen Anne architecture.

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